Posts Tagged 'radishes'

…around the farm the past few weeks

Preparing the rows for planting – after we form the beds with the tractor, we add fertilizer and level off the tops. If our soil was a couple of inches deeper, the bedder attachment would have done this for us – it almost does it in some of the deeper soil areas (6″-8″ mounded). Pretty good for our “shallow, Krome gravelly soils”, as the USGS labels them.

IMG_5486Here I’m documenting what’s being planted in the rows. This is good farming practice, and is required recordkeeping for organic certification. Why? These kinds of records allow the farmer to keep track of what’s planted where, so s/he can maintain a rotation plan for the crops, helping to keep crop-specific pests and diseases minimized, and prevent excessive soil nutrient depletion.
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The baby Lacinato Kale plants are coming right along, with their drip irrigation delivering water right to the root zone of the plant, where it is needed.

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These D’Avignon French Breakfast radishes are popping out of the ground, ready to be harvested. Yummy!

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Just a few weeks later, here’s those kale plants last week, nearly ready for first harvest as bunches. Look for some at the market on Sunday, and soon in the CSA shares.

IMG_5955farm pictures courtesy of Marian Wertlka-RedlandRambles.com

 

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February 28th Market Details

I’ve been meaning to do a post about our farmer’s market on Sundays. This week I was finally inspired by the beautiful weather as well as by the colors and freshness of the produce. All of these pictures where taken in the early morning either as we were setting up or shortly after.

The variety of radishes is what got me started. From left to right: French Breakfast, a mild and almost sweet radish, Purple Plum, another mild and sweet variety, Daikon, a sharp Japanese radish commonly used in pickling and Red Round, a classic mild variety.

Rainbow Chard is always a favorite of mine. I really enjoy harvesting it and making bunches with the saturated jewel tone stems.

Red Potatoes and Heirloom Beans, a couple of staples at our stand. The beans were damaged by the frost, but certain varieties have recovered better than others so we have been able to bring a small quantity every Sunday; they sell out fast!

Whenever we can bring Paradise Farms’ Oyster Mushrooms, we do, because they are beautiful, succulent and fresh.

If you like tartness you should try these pints of little Tangerines. This tree on the farm is a favorite pit stop for us when we’re working as well as for farm tours. I love the fruit and I love the smell of the flowers even more which resemble Orange blossoms.

Canistel is another staple at our stand. When I walk the market I’ve never seen any other vendor selling this fruit. I consider it a pride of South Florida because the trees grow and produce abundantly down here and the fruits are uniquely delicious. I find their culinary versatility very interesting and fun to play with.

For the past two weeks we have been able to bring quarts of Loquats (for an amazing price of $3.00 each!). A friend and CSA memeber, Steve, has a 15 acre grove which just got certified organic of mostly Lychees and other fruit trees. He has been calling us over to pick the hundreds of perfectly ripe Loquats and we’ve been going! This item is a real treat, hopefully it lasts a couple more weeks.

Last, but not least, I’d like to mention our bouquets. They change from week to week based on what’s blooming on the farm. Lately I’ve been using a lot of Amaranth, which is a deep burgundy panicle that contrasts beautifully with pale toned flowers and bright greens. I love to use herbs, both leaves and flowers, as much for their look as for their scent. This bouquet features a few of my favorites including Amaranth, Mint, Nigella (a relative of cumin), Lemon Basil and Kailaan flowers (a Chinese Kale).

If you haven’t been able to make it to the market in a while, or you’ve never been, I hope this post inspires you to come out next week.

We are at the Pinecrest Green Market at Pinecrest Gardens on Sundays from 9am-2pm.


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